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Quiet Morning at Calvary-St. George’s, NYC

On Saturday, March 19th beginning at 9am and ending at noon, Matthew Paul Buccheri will be leading a Quiet Morning entitled, “The Jesus Prayer: Silence and Stillness.” The morning will begin with a brief teaching. We will then do a 30-minute recitation of the Jesus Prayer together. Then there will be about 90 minutes of personal time to keep silence. We’ll then end our time together with another 30-minute recitation of the Jesus Prayer. This is a great opportunity to learn more about and practice a form of Christian spirituality that dovetails nicely with the season of Lent. Bagels and coffee…

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Holy Week Reflection: Monday

By Matthew Paul Buccheri 37When he came near the place where the road goes down the Mount of Olives…the whole crowd of disciples…began joyfully…to praise God in loud voices for all the miracles they had seen: 38”Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!” “Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” 39Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to Jesus, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples!” 40 “I tell you,” he replied, “if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out.” In the ancient world, especially in Rome, when a king was about to enter the…

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The Anglican Ascetic (Part 4)

By Matthew Paul Buccheri “The teleological end of liturgical asceticism is to be further conformed to Christ, riding upward on baptism’s artesian fountain.”[1]  Finally we come to the telos of the liturgical-ascetical experience according to Fagerberg: union with God.  This deepest union–described by some as deification, by others as theosis, and still by others as theologia–is the re-likening of humanity; it is the process of becoming truly human…once again. While retaining God’s image, what the fall of Adam and Eve stripped humanity of–the likeness of God–is restored in and through our union with the incarnate-dead-resurrected-and-ascended Jesus Christ.  Therefore, the entire…

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The Anglican Ascetic (Part 2)

Follow the Leader A central feature of monastic life was the simple fact that it was lay movement.  Moreover, the practices associated with asceticism were not limited to the clergy and in many cases were developed and encouraged by monks.   That is to say, ordained clergy were not central to the role of prayer in the earliest phases of the Church.  But as the Church began to “clericalize” throughout time, the prayer routines throughout the day followed close behind.  This “clericalization” can be clearly seen in the rubrics of Morning and Evening Prayer, historically.  One place where this is the…

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The Anglican Ascetic

Donald W. Fagerberg’s recent book On Liturgical Asceticism sets out to demonstrate that the adjective “liturgical” and the noun “asceticism” fundamentally belong side-by-side. If the goal of the Christian life, Fagerberg argues, is theologia, (borrowing the term from Evagrius) or theosis–that is, deified union with God–then the means to achieve such a state necessarily requires this collision of concepts.

By drawing on the Eastern Orthodox tradition of asceticism, Fagerberg argues convincingly that asceticism alone gives deeper insights into the experience of liturgy and therefore paves the way to this deepest union with God in Christ.