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Sins I’m Giving Up for Lent: None!

I recently did a “thought experiment” on my Facebook page.  I asked the question (to my 1000+ “friends”), “What sins are you giving up for Lent?” In parentheses I added the qualification, “trick question.” I really did not think that many people would “fall for it,” or “take the bate.” Frankly, I thought that folks would (rightly) object to such a public display of a personal, spiritual matter. Now I won’t list for you the various answers, but suffice to say that folks chimed right in with a battery of sins, some of which you could guess. Think with me,…

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Sins I’m Giving Up for Lent: None

By Fr. Matt Boulter I recently did a “thought experiment” on my Facebook page.  I asked the question (to my 1000+ “friends”), “What sins are you giving up for Lent?” In parentheses I added the qualification, “trick question.” I really did not think that many people would “fall for it,” or “take the bait.” Frankly, I thought that folks would (rightly) object to such a public display of a personal, spiritual matter. Now I won’t list for you the various answers, but suffice to say that folks chimed right in with a battery of sins, some of which you could…

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Virtue, Anglican Style (Part 5)

By Fr. Matt Boulter In showing that worship is humanity’s true end, two voices which Kirk enlists are those of Psalm 24 (“Those with clean hands and a pure heart … will seek the face of the God of Jacob”) and Psalm 27 (“One thing have I asked of the LORD, and that will I seek: to behold the beauty of the LORD, and to inquire in his temple”). These two ancient Hebrew poems, separated by only a few strophai in the Hebrew Bible, are among the most provocative of all the voices Kirk brings to bear upon this issue…

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Virtue, Anglican Style (Part 4)

By Fr. Matt Boulter We turn now to a consideration of virtue as represented in the Anglican tradition, the representative in this case being Kenneth Kirk, who stands in direct succession with the moral tradition of virtue on at least two of the three features articulated above: the necessity of a pre-theoretical (note Aristotle’s use of theoretikos above) practice and an anthropological commitment to man as teleological by nature. (On the other of my three “marks” of the moral tradition of virtue – the priority of the social – Kirk is silent. We will forgive him for that, however, since…

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Virtue, Anglican Style (Part 2)

We turn now to a consideration of the priority of practice – the practice of philosophy – in each of the three predecessor cultures. Once again, we see a unity among the differences: in all three cultures there is what Pierre Hadot calls a “philosophy before the [moral] philosophy.” Before an agent can know what is good or right (let alone succeed in doing it) she must do something other than – she must do something before – knowing. Knowledge of the good is conditioned by something prior. The pre-classical society of the heroic is perhaps the most difficult case…